Ashtanga Yoga

Ashtanga Yoga

 

 

 

 

Ashtanga is a series of postures done in a certain order every time at a particular pace. This is not to be confused with Vinyasa Yoga where an instructor has the artistic license to build their own sequence and pace.

 

Ashtanga is great for beginners or for more experienced Yogis to adopt in their own practice. While the postures are dynamic and physically tough the practice is excellent as it focuses on constantly moving the body between postures that sync dynamically with the breath. This sequence practice can help you with good breathing techniques both for Asana and Meditation. 

 

If you browse the web you can find many image charts related to the sequences offered in Ashtanga. The most prominent sequences for Ashtanga and the ones I would suggest for anyone but (beginner especially) would be the Sun Salutation or Surya Namaskara A & B. These sequences are considered a lighter series…but when done correctly, with proper pace and 5x’s can be challenging. When I first started Yoga these routines were primary in my practice. I did these routines for 20 minutes and beyond every day which gave me a great overall foundation for breathwork and the flexibility for other postures. There are Primary, Intermediate and Advanced charts that can be had online as well. 

 

 

 

These PDF images on this blog are provided to you free by https://www.ashtangayoga.info/practice/downloads/cheat-sheets-pdf/

 

 

Ashtanga yoga was developed by K. Pattabhi Jois, who was influenced by Patanjali's Eight Limbs of Yoga. Pattabhi was a student of Krishnamacharya who is considered the father of modern yoga, a scholar, and ayurvedic healer.  The Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute in Mysore, India was then established in 1948.

 

 

As with many Yoga Practices, there are traditional Mantras that are chanted at the beginning and end of the sequences. 

 


 

 

 

 

In closing, you may find variations of Ashtanga Yoga but the core of it is Tristhana meaning the focus of three places of attention: breathing (pranayama), postures (asanas), and "eye focus" (drishti). These three are the core concepts for this practice. Ashtanga engages the three levels of purification in yoga practice: the body, the nervous system, and the mind.

 

 

To your good health!

Sat Nam ਸਤਿ ਨਾਮੁ

Soorya Kirti Kaur

 

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